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13/02/2019

Planning - The next generation

Words:
Young people

As our Careers Survey revealed, there is concern about how the planning profession will attract and recruit new planners. Tony Bateman, Managing Director of Pegasus Group outlines what his firm is doing to reach and recruit planning's next generation - and why that matters

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‘What do you want to be when you grow up?’ is a question all of us have either asked or been asked. 

Not often heard, however, are the words ‘a town planner’. 

Which is a shame, because anyone already working in the industry knows the fantastic opportunities offered by a career in planning or urban design.

As a profession, we must change how we promote ourselves, because if we don’t there simply won’t be enough skilled personnel to carry out the ever-growing volume of specialised work. 

Pegasus Group firmly believes that in order to attract more young people we need to shout loudly about who we are and what we do – we’ll never bring in the best new talent if we remain the best kept secret! 

So where do we find the next generation of planners? 

Graduate opportunities are great, they offer the perfect blend of personal and professional development. But they rely on people who have already committed to the industry and secured a degree in a relevant discipline, be it Town Planning or Urban Design.

"From day one apprentices play an important part of the team, working and learning practical skills that they’ll use throughout their careers"

Perhaps we need to get to our future employees even before then? 

Pegasus Group actively supports and encourage apprenticeships throughout the business, looks to build relationships with various colleges, strives to foster ambition, and encourages continuous training and development, therefore organically growing talent.

From day one apprentices play an important part of the team, working and learning practical skills that they’ll use throughout their careers. On the job learning provides an experience that is second to none – a professional qualification, mentorship from the best in the business and all the while earning money. 

We know we need to go even further to attract young talent and as such we are keen to continue developing a presence at school careers fairs where we can target young people as they look to choose their GCSE options and sell-in our amazing profession alongside the 6th form centres, the colleges and the military! 

Looking at the facts, what’s not to love?

  • A diverse career where no two days are the same
  • The opportunity to make decisions that shape the way people live
  • Contributing to society in a positive way
  • Feeling proud of the work you do. 

Generation Z – people born between 1996 and 2010 – is finally coming of age. If we can introduce them to wonders of planning and urban design today, we will ensure that tomorrow they will have the careers and we will have the environments of which we can all be proud.

Tony Bateman is Managing Director of Pegasus Group


Find out more about careers with Pegasus Group

Pegasus Group offers new planners two routes into planning: an apprenticeship and graduate scheme.

If you’re interested in either, please do contact us to find out more. If you’re generally interested in careers with Pegasus, get in touch!

 

To find out more about careers with Pegasus Group, please visit our careers page or contact Steph.Mumford@pegasusgroup.co.uk

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