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26/02/2021

RTPI blog round-up: Are planning enforcement teams under threat?

Words: RTPI

A round-up of RTPI blogs: 30 January-26 February 2021

Are planning enforcement teams under threat?

Planning enforcement services are under more pressure than ever. Local residents are more demanding, with the recent lockdowns amplifying strength of feeling between neighbours. More construction, encouraged by central government, results in more unauthorised development...

By Neill Whittaker, chairman of NAPE 

Zoning, the Policy Exchange and the white paper

The Planning for the Future white paper’s proposal is for simplified local plans to put land in three categories: growth areas, renewal areas and protected areas.

General development management policies would be set nationally, with Local Plans containing “clear rules” with design codes and site and area-specific requirements.

Beyond the examples given of what the growth areas and renewal areas might include, there is no detail as to how these areas should be identified or how broad/extensive such zones should be...

By John Litton QC

A digital first approach to planning - fundamental innovation or a pipe dream?

The planning white paper states, “The planning system is based on 20th century technology: planning systems are reliant on legacy software that burdens the sector with repetitive tasks.”...

By Rebecca Roffe

A lockdown apprenticeship: getting to grips with the world of planning during a global pandemic

To mark National Apprenticeship Week 2021 (#NAW21), the RTPI is running a series of blogs looking at the personal experiences of Cara Collier and Lauren Miller on the RTPI apprenticeship journey.

By Cara Collier and Lauren Miller

Balancing study and work on an RTPI apprenticeship: Gemma's story

To mark National Apprenticeship Week 2021 (#NAW21), the RTPI is running a series of blogs looking at the personal experiences of Gemma Williams and Juliet Seymour on the RTPI apprenticeship journey.

By Gemma Williams and Juliet Seymour

The duty to cooperate and its future

In many ways, the Planning for the Future white paper tells us what we already know: that, on the whole, the duty to cooperate does not work. While the Duty is also relevant to employment, industrial and other forms of development, it is largely focused on the issue of housing delivery. In this country, we have constantly failed to plan for, and to deliver, the number of houses that we need and the Duty to Cooperate has done little to ensure that shortfall in one area is made up elsewhere...

By Chris Young QC

If it ain’t broke, why fix it? A planning solicitor’s reflections on CIL and S106

The prime minister proposes radical reform to the planning system which will be “unlike anything we have seen since the Second World War”. This includes a complete overhaul of the current system of section 106 agreements and the Community Infrastructure Levy (“CIL”) regime...

By Kathryn Jump

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