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13/05/2022

Appeals round-up: Andrew confirms 1,000-home development in Watership Down landscape, Economic benefits of Newcastle tower outweigh ‘regrettable’ harm to neighbours

Words: Ben Gosling
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A round-up of planning appeals: 07 May- 13 May, 2022

Dog training centre falls foul of living standards concerns

A proposed dog training centre in Deeping St James, Lincolnshire, has been refused after an inspector concluded that the activities at the site would have a harmful impact on residents in neighbouring properties.

The Planner

No ‘functional need’ for worker’s accommodation at glamping site

A Suffolk glamping site has been refused permission for an temporary on-site house for an employee, after an inspector judged that the dwelling was unnecessary, and would harm a nearby conservation area.

The Planner

Banbridge wind turbine would not impact landscape

A commissioner has granted planning permission to a wind turbine in Banbridge, County Down, after finding that the development would not harm the landscape, living conditions of nearby residents, or local wildlife.

The Planner

Lack of housing supply not enough to justify Slough apartments

A development of 84 flats in Slough, Berkshire, has been refused after an inspector concluded that the harm caused to the area’s character, and lack of affordable housing and mix of housing types outweighed the proposal’s benefits.

The Planner

Loss of facility lands golf course housing proposal in the rough

A development of 233 homes at a Widnes golf club has been dismissed after an inspector found that the loss of the sports facility outweighed the proposal’s contribution to local housing stock.

The Planner

Economic benefits of Newcastle tower outweigh ‘regrettable’ harm to neighbours

An inspector has granted planning permission for a residential tower on Newcastle’s Quayside after deciding that the development would not harm local heritage, and was justified by the benefits it would offer to the local economy.

The Planner

Andrew confirms 1,000-home development in Watership Down landscape

Housing minister Stuart Andrew has backed an inspector’s decision to allow outline planning permission for more than 1,000 homes, a primary school, a local centre with commercial floor space and a country park in Newbury, Berkshire – within an area close to ancient woodlands that provided the setting for the book Watership Down.

The Planner

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